In August 2007 I blogged about our Alexa statistics in terms of visits. There were comments about the appropriateness of Alexa as a measure of traffic. I was encouraged by one of the commenters to look at Compete:

  1. Peter Schneider says:
    Alexa can be manipulated to a certain extend by webmasters simply using the Alexa toolbar.

    Interestingly, chemspider does not appear in compete:
    http://siteanalytics.compete.com/chemspider.com

    So the Alexa Rank does not give a clear signal.

Since then I’ve been watching Compete as well as our own internal statistics. Both suggest the traffic continues to grow quite consistently.

compete

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3 Responses to “Compete Statistics as a Measure of ChemSpider Traffic”

  1. Rich Apodaca says:

    I’ve never understood the appeal of using statistics from services like Alexa and Compete. Possibly to augment more direct measurement approaches – but as the primary measure – why?

    What’s the advantage over Google Analytics, which is trivial to install, measures actual hits by only user agents capable of JavaScript (i.e., mostly browsers), doesn’t rely on extrapolated statistics from volunteers installing a plugin (who by definition aren’t representative), and is completely free?

  2. Antony Williams says:

    Rich….we use other tools for measuring our traffic as I have commented elsewhere on this blog. I’m not saying that Compete is a good or accurate measure but it had been suggested, on numerous occasions, as something to watch. It’s difficult to get accurate statistics from anywhere regarding how many people are visiting our site. How many people behind a single IP address visit a site for example? What’s good to see is the trend..

  3. Jane Savoie says:

    In reply to Rich

    I personaly refuse to use Google analytics as I don’t want them knowing my business, by installing their analytics you are giving them a huge amount of information that they may use to determine your search ranking

    let’s say for example that you have a large bounce rate… Google could use that information agains you whe determining search engine position

    Or lets say that you have an affiliate site that is designed to quickly funnel your traffic towards a merchant page, once again Google will be able to see that your visitors left your site in a hurry (which would not reresent a good user experience in the eyes og Google)

    I prefer Statcounter.com… it’s awesome and was aroung long before google analytics… it’s Free!

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